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Law clinic studies the trade aspects of Qatar’s blockade under the WTO’s principles | Qatar University

Law clinic studies the trade aspects of Qatar’s blockade under the WTO’s principles

2017-09-27 00:00:00.0

A team from LAWC led by Dr Talal Al-Emadi, LAWC Assistant Professor of Oil and Gas Law and Editor-in-Chief of the International Review of Law (IRL), launched a World Trade Organization (WTO) law clinic to study how the Qatar’s blockade could be analyzed under the WTO’s principles.

The team includes LAWC Associate Professor and Sir William Blair Chair in Alternative Dispute Resolution Dr Francis Botchway and LAWC Assistant Professor and Centre for Law and Development (CLD) Director Dr Jon Truby. Twenty-four LAWC senior students are registered in the clinic.

Themed “A WTO Legal Clinic on Qatar’s Blockade”, the study is conducted under the umbrella of the TradeLab, a project supported by a 3-year National Priorities Research Program (NPRP) grant, and in collaboration with the Graduate Institute, Geneva and Georgetown University in Qatar.

The team is studying the aspects of the blockade that violate the WTO’s principles and the procedures that Qatar should suggest. It also provides the solutions and remedies that are available for Qatar. The results of the study will be revealed by end of 2017 in a form of a free of charge report that will be distributed to the public and submitted to the Ministry of Economy and Commerce in Qatar.

Commenting on the study, Dr Talal Al-Emadi said: “Qatar has already made an official complaint to the World Trade Organization’s Dispute Settlement Body against the countries that are leading the blockade. This study will allow our students to investigate answers for how the blockade in Qatar could be analyzed under the WTO’s principles. It also focuses on the trade aspects of the blockade and its consequences within the context of the international trading system overseen by the WTO. All the countries that are directly involved in the dispute are members in the WTO, hence they are bound by the WTO’s articles and principles, such as the Most-favoured-nation (MFN).”